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British People Are Naming Their Babies After Drake and Iggy Azalea


There’s no denying that babies need names, but why are they often so irritating? People are out there naming their kids things like Kaele, Asher or Josiah. Even worse, sometimes they name their children after fictional characters and celebrities. Today, we’ve learned that British folks are naming their children after a wide variety of pop stars.

The Office of National Statistics  has released a new study revealing the most popular pop culture-related names in England and Wales. The data compiles naming trends across those countries in 2014.

Despite the fact that she’s yet to truly break through in North America, singer and actress Rita Ora had the most popular first name, with 65 babies bearing that moniker. While it’s true that the parents may have named her after a different Rita, the data reveals that the name spiked in popularity overall after Ora released her debut album in 2012.

Drake came in second place, with 33 British babies donning the name of the 6 god in 2014. Similar to Ora, his name rose in popularity since the release of his Thank Me Later album in 2010, with a record 49 Drakes being born in 2012. The contentious and highly divisive Iggy Azalea released her debut album The New Classic in 2014, and now 30 British tots are called Azalea.

Of course, it wouldn’t be Britain without some passionate One Direction love. The members of the world-dominating boy band have inspired thousands of baby names. Though they also might be paying tribute to Potter or even Shearer, parents have befitted 5,379 children with the name Harry in 2014. Louis inspired 999 babies, while Liam inspired 902. Though he’s not even a member anymore, Zayn inspired 231 baby names, while poor Niall came in with a paltry 155 babies.

Other pop cultural mainstays include Game of Thrones (there are 53 more Khaleesi’s learning their first words in Britain now), FrozenX-Men, the Kardashians and Downton Abbey. Keeping things British as fuck, there were 132 babies named Benedict in 2014. Read more from the study here.